Chaga Mushroom Tincture Benefits: The Power of Extracted Chaga Conk

The unique properties of conch and the benefits of Chaga mushroom tincture

Chaga is truly a unique organism. This fungus grows inconspicuously as a grain in very unlikely places – that is, it can thrive at -40 degrees Fahrenheit (or Celsius, since -40 ° is where they meet), as far as Siberia and Lapland. Its ability to withstand extreme conditions is a reflection of its strength and its powerful offering to the human body — especially when taken as a tincture. Keep reading to learn about the benefits of chaga mushroom tincture and a delicious chaga chai recipe!

The Benefits of Chaga Mushroom Tincture: An Ancient Support in a Bottle

Chaga physiology is hard, with an abrasive, dark outer layer that appears charred and cracked and reminiscent of petrified wood or bark. Its color is due to its high levels of melanin, which works wonders as a skin protector — both for itself and for those who consume it. A non-mycophile will easily mistake chaga for an unusual piece of woody material. They may not even notice the grain out in the wild, as its surface is often uniform with its host tree and looks like a swollen growth. Chaga is one of the least edible of all mushrooms.

Nikita Velikanin

Like most tweezers, chaga can be used as a fire extinguisher. Chaga and its relatives have a reputation for being the multi-tool fungus of survivors. There are accounts of people using conks to transport coal far and wide. Ötzi, the wet mummy, lived almost 5,300 years ago and was discovered in 1991, carrying amadou and birch mushrooms. Hollow, these embers make a great container for carrying embers thanks to their extremely slow and continuous burning properties.

Chaga, or tschaga in Russian, it is considered by the Moscow Medical Institute as an effective immune support. It has a deep-rooted history in the Slavic regions.

The benefits of chaga are most accessible when consumed as a tea or tincture. Read on to learn how to enjoy the benefits of chaga mushroom tincture and tea and our favorite recipe.

Chaga mushroom from tree to tea

To harvest chaga in the wild, you need an ax or saw. Chaga is so hard that it can break conventional coffee grinders, so be careful when processing at home. If you do not have access to an industrial grinder, you can put pieces of chaga in a plastic bag wrapped in a towel or burlap sack and break them with a hammer. With your chaga pieces you can make a super healthy tea.

AdaptogenShrooms Chaga Mushroom blog

Access the benefits of Chaga found in AdaptogenShrooms’s powerful extracts

Natalie Granger

You may have heard the “chaga chai” trend floating around in health conscious communities. At AdaptogenShrooms, we offer ready-to-use, potent tinctures. Our tinctures are lovingly made from organically grown mushrooms and every product sold plants a tree. Our mushroom tinctures can be taken alone or mixed into a drink and work great in homemade tonics. One of my favorite ways to access the benefits of chaga mushroom tincture is to use it in this mushroom chai recipe…

Mushroom Chai Recipe: Enjoy the benefits of Chaga and more with our mushroom tincture

Components

  • 1.5 cups of non-dairy milk
  • 1 tablespoon loose leaf chai or a sachet of your favorite chai blend
  • 3 droppers of Mush 10 tincture
  • Honey or maple syrup (optional)
  • Pinch of salt (optional)

Steps

  1. Add milk to a small saucepan.
  2. Add chai — loose or bagged — and bring to a simmer.
  3. Add 2 droppers of Mush Tincture 10. Optionally, add sweetener and salt to taste.
  4. Let the tea brew for 3-4 minutes on low heat, covered.
  5. For a latte-like texture, use a frother, steamer, or immersion blender. Another option is to carefully pour the liquid into a carafe blender and blend on the lowest setting for about 30 seconds.
  6. Pour into a jar or mug and enjoy!

Defend yourself with chaga’s unparalleled, supportive compounds and tough, resilient energy with one of our tinctures.

Did you know that for every item AdaptogenShrooms sells, a tree is planted?
Learn more about ours One Tree Program here.

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